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>> regular meeting of the board of education for the unified school district for october 9, is now called to order. >> roll call >> miss fewer? >> here. >> miss mendoza, here. >> miss wins? >> here. >> miss ly. >> here. >> thank you. >> you may join me in the pledge of allegiance. lye,. >> miss fewer? >> yes. >> dr. merasi? >> aye. >> and mr. yee. >> six ayes. >> thank you. >> presentation to the board of education superintendents report tonight, your thoughts for the evening. >> thank you president yee and good evening, everyone. i hope that everyone had a wonderful weekend this weekend in san francisco. it is definitely filled with exciting activities. we are so fortunate to live in a city where we have a robust offering of cultural activities. i also want to add my voice to the course of those across the city that are saying, go giants >> this past friday, our middle school students over 3,000 of our middle school students, were treated to an exclusive concert, at the harley strictty blue grass festival at the golden gate park. thanks to the late warren hellman, a true men of sa
the early education programs and how to better align the pre-k with elementary schools. we invite other kind of partner groups that we work with, to just kind of give an opportunity for other family and education advocate to have indepth discussion about important issues in the district. over the rest of the fall and the winter we are going to have more of these briefings and we are going to be meeting to hear about the low plan and the services for english learns and also here about the special education services are changing to be more ininclusive and we will be doing that throughout this year. >> okay. thank you. >> okay any comments? any questions from the board? >> commissioner fewer? >> thank you, president yee. thank you for your report. i wanted to know if you had received copies of the presentation that was at the select committee meeting and also at the curriculum committee meeting on special education and we also looked at, at that time, i think that you were there ruth and we talked about the disproportionality of african americans under the emotionally disturbed diagnosis and al
proceedings it is about transparently in government and education we. have over 70 law schools and students who have unlimited access to this level. and so in large part, what we are trying to do, or what i have done, is tried to restore faith here in our government institutions by seeing how our court system works. your court system is not perfect, but when people see how our jury system actually works and learn about that, it is one step closer to again, reengaging a citizen in government. and we have to use technology, it is one of those credible tools that while people are disenfranchised in what is going on in sacramento with the lack of transparency, we can have a much more service-oriented government that reengages people. >> so speaking of service orientation, what do you think that the government should do? and where should the government step aside? >> in terms of... >> what do you think is the role of government? it is a very general question. >> so, the role of government is to provide basic services that the private sector would just not provide. i mean, education, i mean, it i
you. mr. leno. >> the 47 out of 50 states figure that miss dillan used is not in educational out comes it is in per pupil. we rank 47th. >> as a result we rank 50 as the number of counselors and the number of nurses in our schools and the number of libranias in. you get what you pay for. >> our state has been starved for cash for the past ten years as a result of tax cuts the state could not afford that the prior governor put on the credit cards. we need to provide significantly more funding not only through k-12 education which is the birth right of every child to be able to get a quality public education in my opinion and to be able to pursue the dream of a higher education and that is getting further and further out of the reach of children in california because the state does not support education. we need funding, we need to spend it on education. >> so, therefore, do you think that community colleges should perhaps change their focus? one idea is to focus on retraining unemployed workers and upgrading skills for new jobs. do you feel that the state should encourage this? and how?
, cut. and reenvig rate what our priorities are. the example is education verses the bullet train, i don't think that we can have both right now. >> thank you. >> mr. leno? >> yes. what i have learned through ten years of working in the state legislature, is we have a very serious and significant governor nans problem and that is two-thirds vote requirement on the most important issue of the day which is revenue. we have seen our revenue cut significantly by taxes that arnold schwarzenegger cut his first day in office. we have a depoll that prop is trying to refill it. we should not have to do it at the ballot box when out of 40 state senators 14 have more power than 26. 14 can veto when 26 want. i tell fifth graders that and they say that is not democracy that is not possible. that is exactly the problem, we don't have democracy on all issues, revenue-related in the legislature, let the majority party do its job and if the voters don't like what the majority party is doing in no one jerry man dered districts change who is in power, it is call democracy. >> continuing on the theme of dem
that he and the family provided. his contributions to our education community will be sorely missed, but for the generations to come forward for will provide, continue to provide the kind of education and job skills that we need for our city. over the last few weeks, i have been working closely with the city college to assess their fiscal, managerial, and accreditation issues. i want to thank the people behind me. in particular, the interim chancellor pamela fisher is here, and the current trustees, natalie burke is here today, i need a barrier is also here. thank you very much. also representing our students, mr. walker is here as well. [applause] with any educational institution that has value as our city college, not only did we work with those that are currently involved with them, but we worked as a city family. there is no way to express at this time the need to have this a family together to support our city college. so also i have representatives of the comptroller's office, then rosenfield, mickey callahan, the human resources divisions that are here today, nadia from our p
privatized. all of the higher education is being privatized. all through the uc system. how do you run a modern state with tax cuts? we resort to desperate, back last november, we were asked to vote to make four indian casinos in san diego county pony up money. i thought this was a joke. they voted to do it. now, the governor proposes to borrow against future revenues. how did they deal with these social problems when the economic problems were far worse than what we can imagine today? this is from larry halprin's. and it has these quotes from roosevelt on the wall. he said in one of his talks to the people, "the test is not whether we have more, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little". it's a different philosophy than that which we have become used to. what i am going to show you is a lost civilization. it's a strange place. and yet, it becomes oddly familiar after a while because we built it and use it every day without knowing it. it has been buried. the living new deal project is like an archaeological dig. we are going after the new deal in california, but h
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
community of people sharing cars. that lets us find great cars, educate the owners, educate the renters, and ensure there is the right balance and variety of cars. if you look on the site in san francisco, you will literally see cars all over the place. it is all over the bay area. you are seeing cars sharing happening in places it never had before. we worked with the city to see if there were any ways we could get out the word. we hope to work with existing programs or be added as an additional transportation solution. in general, we like to involve the city and city leaders in our announcement of coming to market, and it has been working really well. >> i know you have community managers all over the globe. what's going on there? >> airbnb goes to network effects. we are all over in -- we are already in 19 cities all over the world. we just provide the tools on line, and local residents throughout the world decide they want to be part of the movement and part of airbnb and list their homes on the site, and local travelers decide they want to go somewhere and look for those. the amazi
to plan a robust education and notification to customers about this program. that involves paid media, partnering with community-based organizations to make sure we are really talking through folks who have contacts within the communities. and it is a community engagement program. we expect to be partnering with other city departments, including the department of environment as we embark on this education and notification program. you will see on the consent agenda, 8c has us procuring additional resources through a contract so we will have an extensive outreach program. i wanted to also take a moment to remind the commission of the steps that we had been asked to -- conditions rather, we had been asked to meet prior to launching the program. these are simply the conditions that you had articulated us to meet in the resolution you approved in advance of going to the board of supervisors for approval. so this is a quick summary of those conditions. i can say that -- i can give you a quick status on each of those. so clean power s.f. rates have to be approved by pickup -- puc and board
in the san francisco public schools and i am quite dismayed. so i asked educators, parents and kids to do your best to stop the bullying in our schools. because it must stop. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> i think that it is roll call, right? >> thank you, is anyone else adding their name to the resolution? >> thank you. >> miss ly? >> yes. >> miss fewer? >> yes. >> miss maufus? >> yes. >> mendoza? >> yes. >> dr. murase? >> aye. >> miss norton, wynns. >> aye. and mr. yee. >> aye. and this is as amended >> item s. board meetings reports any standing committees there should be, let's see, augmented ad hoc committee on personal matters and labor relations, commission ter rachel norton is not here. and who is there? besides me and... >> so there was one informational item that was discussed previously and it was a salary issue of the san francisco unified school district and verses the city and county of san francisco. so we had a discussion around that and basically we asked for further study, i think, of the issue. >> say that again? >> a working group was to be formed. and then... >> that
two percent of your monthly income. >> you can enroll in free educational services online. just as it -- visit sfsmartmoney.org. with services like financial education classes and one-on-one meetings with advisers, asset smart money network makes it easy for you to learn all you need to know about managing, saving, investing, and protecting your money. the network offers access to hundreds of financial aid programs. to help their eruptions, fill out the quick questionnaire, and you will be steered to the program you are looking for. >> who want to make sure everyone has the chance to manage their money successfully, keep their money safe, and avoid getting ripped off. >> it sounds very good. i think people should try that one. >> to find out more, visit sfsmartmoney.org or call 211 and ask about the bank on s.f. program. >> now you can have a bank account. open one today. >> and it is my honor to introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countr
are spending on year for education whereas someone is educated and having a job there they are not going to go to jail, it is very unlikely. so i would say that there might be something like determinive sentencing which would allow someone who is drug addiction and you could provide the judge with the discretion to actually have them in treatment rather than costing the tax payers thousands of dollars. so we have to save the seniors the services that they need and we have to be willing to make hard reform. >> now we come to the candidate' closing statements if you are not registered to vote, please do so right away and urge your friends and family to register stao. the deadline is october 22nd. if you have moved you need to register again with the new address, if you have changed your name you need to register again with the new name. all right. so we will do the closing statements in reverse, alphabetical order and please remember that you have tr two minutes >> thank you for organizing our decision and thank you for showing up. >> i am running because we don't need people in sacramento to t
education, again, to try to break the cycle. we will be using the same system and, hopefully, where we can get to later to predict with the next violence they occur and deploy resources there so that we are efficient and even more so -- we are not random in our application of our efforts to eliminate this violence. all you have to do is look at the room. it is unbelievable the amount of people that are now in the conversation, and we need to stay in the conversation. even in -- even if this current state of violence subsides, it has positioned itself, and it will come back. we will be tracking our list and anyone else who makes the list forever. you go online now, you can always find it forever. if you make our lives, we will track you in and out of the justice system. if you leave the system forever, that is fine with us, too. if anybody wants to turn in a gun, we do not need an arrest. we just want the gun. like the mayor said, if you are worried about being proclaimed somebody who is a tattle tale, that your working with police, get that gun to the clergy. they have offered to receive i
, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
, these kids are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
the opportunity to educate everyone. it is a pleasure for me to work under the direction of mayor lee. he is a public safety championship. he is a prepared as champion. he lives it. i have seen his kids and his workplace. it is all about teamwork. i am proud to be working with chief suhr. and scott weiner, it is a pleasure to have you out here. we appreciate it. it is a great team. thank you to the people who are out here. and also our partners with the american red cross. who are here this morning. thank you for being here. it has been a tradition for many of us out here. i hope you have a great day and you remember what happened 106 years ago. it is great to be a san franciscan. >> a nice hand for the chief, everybody. i have seen this other chief speaking in the last couple of times. a nice hand for chief suhr. >> good morning. our fire chief said it. we're lucky in san francisco. we have a mayor who has moved through the tears of prepared as an goddess ready to go. we get a little more prepared every day. god bless to the survivors. >> thank you. >> it is a minute of silence at 5-11.
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or elimin
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
in this country. i grew up in new orleans. we believe that education is the key. we all need to sit at the table. i do not believe in segregation for inmates. they need to tear that barrier down and put people together, no matter what. when we go inside the walls of san quentin, it is not just black inmates. it is hispanic, pacific islanders, white, native americans, it is everybody. when they leave that room, they go back to their communities that are segregated. they, too, do not like it. it is a barrier that has to be torn down. i know it works. being in there for the last four years, we make it a point that everybody mixes up, even the seating. you do not just sit with a black person or a white person. it is about all of us, or none of us, and that is the bottom line. it has to be that mentality. >> it is a way to control the prisoners. it takes the pressure off the guards and everybody else. they say we want to stop violence, but you promote a violence by segregating. when an individual comes, the first in the asking, where are you from? what is your nationality? that is how to divide and c
with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
. so we have to get services in there. we have to get education so that we can begin to link the services and begin to intervene as quickly as possible. and when we come back we're going to be talking a little bit more about the dynamics of a family that faces substance and mental disorders. we'll be right back. [music playing] when a family member has a substance abuse or mental disorder, it has a profound impact on the family unit. whether it is the young person who's having an issue and its impact on the siblings and on the parents and their time and effort, their ability to get treatment and help that individual recover. but it's also what happens when a young person has a parent or an adult in their life who is struggling with addiction or who has a mental disorder. so helping the family unit deal with what's going on in the family, as opposed to dealing with just the individual who's having the illness or the addiction, is really critical. when the family discovers that a family member has a mental health problem or a substance use problem, the response of the family de
thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs. the stated purpose o
, they are thinking about their future and thinking about getting through education and going on to the next step. they are not hanging out on the corners. they are part of the evolving success of the city. >> sf city led the effort to get tech companies to place these interns in their currently. >> and ron, i want to get back to sf city in a minute and give the mayor a chance to finish. i think he is on point 2 of the 17-point plan. i want to talk about sf city. >> i have another program called tech sf and that is a program that grew out of working with sf city and with the neighborhoods that wanted these job trainings. it's taking advantage of some $8 million that the federal government gave us to make sure that we don't experience the digital divide that we had experienced a decade ago with the bubble. and so that is aimed at working with city college, with school districts, with our neighborhood youth programs, to evolve a training program that is helped to be created by the tech companies themselves, put a curriculum together. >> great. >> that will allow them to be trained in the right
on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track is a successful program and we've used a very small populatio
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 124 (some duplicates have been removed)